Category Archives: abortion

The Story that Took 10 Years to Tell

by Shanelle Matthews

Originally published at Crunk Feminist Collective.

“Are you in college?” The doctor could tell from my face I wasn’t at all interested in having a conversation. “You speak well. I mean, you’re articulate.” The wrinkles in my forehead deepened. I wrung my fingers tightly around the scratchy, blue exam gown and briefly thought about the woman who wore it before me; what was she like? I looked at him, desperately wanting to not have to actually speak, wishing he could just read my mind. “Yes. I’m in college,” I responded shortly. I was really thinking, “That’s none of your business and really, is this the time to make small talk? When your elbow is deep in my vagina?”
Read more…

The Story that Took 10 Years to Tell

by Shanelle Matthews

Originally published at Crunk Feminist Collective.

“Are you in college?” The doctor could tell from my face I wasn’t at all interested in having a conversation. “You speak well. I mean, you’re articulate.” The wrinkles in my forehead deepened. I wrung my fingers tightly around the scratchy, blue exam gown and briefly thought about the woman who wore it before me; what was she like? I looked at him, desperately wanting to not have to actually speak, wishing he could just read my mind. “Yes. I’m in college,” I responded shortly. I was really thinking, “That’s none of your business and really, is this the time to make small talk? When your elbow is deep in my vagina?”
Read more…

Real Access to Abortion Coverage

by Melissa Torres-Montoya, Esq.

“In seventh grade, I was assigned the anti-abortion side of a debate. The assignment gave me an opportunity to hone my debate skills and win an argument, but more importantly, my research convinced me of a woman’s right to choose abortion.” Read more…

Real Access to Abortion Coverage

by Melissa Torres-Montoya, Esq.

“In seventh grade, I was assigned the anti-abortion side of a debate. The assignment gave me an opportunity to hone my debate skills and win an argument, but more importantly, my research convinced me of a woman’s right to choose abortion.” Read more…

Remembering Those Still Waiting for the Promise of Roe

by Miriam Pérez

Each year the anniversary of Roe brings the reminder that people of color are disproportionately affected by the current state of access to safe abortion care, but often missing from the public dialogue about Roe and abortion. This year I worked with the reproductive justice organization Forward Together on a series of articles from people of color, as well as queer and trans folks, reflecting on this 40th anniversary. Read more…

Remembering Those Still Waiting for the Promise of Roe

by Miriam Pérez

Each year the anniversary of Roe brings the reminder that people of color are disproportionately affected by the current state of access to safe abortion care, but often missing from the public dialogue about Roe and abortion. This year I worked with the reproductive justice organization Forward Together on a series of articles from people of color, as well as queer and trans folks, reflecting on this 40th anniversary. Read more…

Why Abortion Matters to Me

by Nadia Hussain

Abortion is the kind of issue you can lose friends over, it is the kind of issue that leads to never ending arguments from both sides of the spectrum. People fight against the right to have abortion, simply citing religious beliefs. Read more…

Why Abortion Matters to Me

by Nadia Hussain

Abortion is the kind of issue you can lose friends over, it is the kind of issue that leads to never ending arguments from both sides of the spectrum. People fight against the right to have abortion, simply citing religious beliefs. Read more…

Wading in Uncomfortable Waters: Abortion and the Politics of Experience

by Taja Lindley

Originally published at Feministe

Forty years after abortion became legal in the United States we are still wading in waters that run deep.

Arguably, abortion runs as deep in our modern human history as pregnancy does. Our ancestors had ways of terminating pregnancies long before the U.S. Supreme Court existed. And while we commemorate and celebrate the 40th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, we know that it does not mark an anniversary of the beginning of this family planning method. Abortion has been, and will continue to be, part of a wide array of methods that we use to control our bodies and fertility, regardless of its legality. Read more…

Wading in Uncomfortable Waters: Abortion and the Politics of Experience

by Taja Lindley

Originally published at Feministe

Forty years after abortion became legal in the United States we are still wading in waters that run deep.

Arguably, abortion runs as deep in our modern human history as pregnancy does. Our ancestors had ways of terminating pregnancies long before the U.S. Supreme Court existed. And while we commemorate and celebrate the 40th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, we know that it does not mark an anniversary of the beginning of this family planning method. Abortion has been, and will continue to be, part of a wide array of methods that we use to control our bodies and fertility, regardless of its legality. Read more…

5 Things I Learned About Abortion By Checking My Assumptions At the Door

by Samara Azam-Yu

Originally posted at Colorlines.

As a young woman of color and an activist, it can feel like being a tiny, relatively unimportant drop in a formidable tide of change. But one thing makes me certain I must continue to do this work: somehow, women of color, young women, low-income women, immigrant women, and women in rural areas are still waiting while barriers to sexual and reproductive health care, including abortion, continue to trump legal rights and provision of health services, human dignity, and self-determination. Read more…

5 Things I Learned About Abortion By Checking My Assumptions At the Door

by Samara Azam-Yu

Originally posted at Colorlines.

As a young woman of color and an activist, it can feel like being a tiny, relatively unimportant drop in a formidable tide of change. But one thing makes me certain I must continue to do this work: somehow, women of color, young women, low-income women, immigrant women, and women in rural areas are still waiting while barriers to sexual and reproductive health care, including abortion, continue to trump legal rights and provision of health services, human dignity, and self-determination. Read more…

Covering Our Base: Why I Fight for Affordable Reproductive Care

by Morgan Meneses-Sheets

Rachel Atkins once said, “There aren’t women who have abortions and women who have babies. Those are the same women at different points in their lives.”
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Covering Our Base: Why I Fight for Affordable Reproductive Care

by Morgan Meneses-Sheets

Rachel Atkins once said, “There aren’t women who have abortions and women who have babies. Those are the same women at different points in their lives.”
Read more…

Roe v. Wade and Recovering from Shame

by Mai Doan

When I asked one of our young women what she wished had been different, she said that she wished that when young women had abortions they could talk about it with pride. She said that young women who make hard decisions and pull together the strength within themselves and their communities needed to move through the abortion process—these women deserve to be proud of themselves. Read more…

Roe v. Wade and Recovering from Shame

by Mai Doan

When I asked one of our young women what she wished had been different, she said that she wished that when young women had abortions they could talk about it with pride. She said that young women who make hard decisions and pull together the strength within themselves and their communities needed to move through the abortion process—these women deserve to be proud of themselves. Read more…

Choosing Jonah—a family history of abortion, choice and love

by Kristen Zimmerman

Originally posted at Autostraddle.

I have a photograph of my mother that I love. She is 21 standing in her graduation gown beaming expectantly at the camera. Round belly poking through dark drapes, it’s the first portrait of us “together”—me nested inside of her, a sliver of white pressing through the black folds that usually conceal its opening. As if I am graduating too. At this threshold you can see that she (we) just barely made it to this moment. Read more…

Choosing Jonah—a family history of abortion, choice and love

by Kristen Zimmerman

Originally posted at Autostraddle.

I have a photograph of my mother that I love. She is 21 standing in her graduation gown beaming expectantly at the camera. Round belly poking through dark drapes, it’s the first portrait of us “together”—me nested inside of her, a sliver of white pressing through the black folds that usually conceal its opening. As if I am graduating too. At this threshold you can see that she (we) just barely made it to this moment. Read more…

The New Roe

by Kierra Johnson

It was my 16-year-old sister’s unplanned pregnancy and her decision to parent that catapulted me into this work.

Every day, young women and men call Choice USA’s office, visit a campus table, stumble onto our tumblr or facebook, attend a workshop or speaking engagement. They come to us waving many identity banners: Latina, progressive, Baptist, independent, environmentalist, social justice activist, queer, black, immigrant, anti-abortion,Democrat, Catholic….What they all have in common is a unique story set in the 21st century about the real barriers they face as they attempt to access information, medication, and services. Read more…

The New Roe

by Kierra Johnson

It was my 16-year-old sister’s unplanned pregnancy and her decision to parent that catapulted me into this work.

Every day, young women and men call Choice USA’s office, visit a campus table, stumble onto our tumblr or facebook, attend a workshop or speaking engagement. They come to us waving many identity banners: Latina, progressive, Baptist, independent, environmentalist, social justice activist, queer, black, immigrant, anti-abortion,Democrat, Catholic….What they all have in common is a unique story set in the 21st century about the real barriers they face as they attempt to access information, medication, and services. Read more…