Category Archives: women of color

The Right’s Attack on Roe at 40: The Hyde and Helms Legacy

by Malika Redmond

Originally posted at Truthout.org

While celebrating the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, we must also mourn the staying power of rhetoric demonizing women who seek reproductive autonomy – especially the young, the poor, rural women and women of color – and the legislation that blocks their ability to access abortion. Battles over the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act are only the latest example, following two earlier victories that targeted these vulnerable populations both at home and abroad: the Helms and Hyde amendments.
Read more…

The Right’s Attack on Roe at 40: The Hyde and Helms Legacy

by Malika Redmond

Originally posted at Truthout.org

While celebrating the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, we must also mourn the staying power of rhetoric demonizing women who seek reproductive autonomy – especially the young, the poor, rural women and women of color – and the legislation that blocks their ability to access abortion. Battles over the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act are only the latest example, following two earlier victories that targeted these vulnerable populations both at home and abroad: the Helms and Hyde amendments.
Read more…

Reclaiming Spaces: Latinas and Abortion in the U.S.

by Myra Durán

“As one of those young women, I have been on many panels, radio shows and events reaffirming the existence of a generation of activists who are not only involved but integrate these issues into their everyday life. We don’t just limit our activism to abortion and birth control – we constantly have to push back on “apathetic” rhetoric that is used to describe us and our political work.” Read more…

Reclaiming Spaces: Latinas and Abortion in the U.S.

by Myra Durán

“As one of those young women, I have been on many panels, radio shows and events reaffirming the existence of a generation of activists who are not only involved but integrate these issues into their everyday life. We don’t just limit our activism to abortion and birth control – we constantly have to push back on “apathetic” rhetoric that is used to describe us and our political work.” Read more…

Remembering Those Still Waiting for the Promise of Roe

by Miriam Pérez

Each year the anniversary of Roe brings the reminder that people of color are disproportionately affected by the current state of access to safe abortion care, but often missing from the public dialogue about Roe and abortion. This year I worked with the reproductive justice organization Forward Together on a series of articles from people of color, as well as queer and trans folks, reflecting on this 40th anniversary. Read more…

Remembering Those Still Waiting for the Promise of Roe

by Miriam Pérez

Each year the anniversary of Roe brings the reminder that people of color are disproportionately affected by the current state of access to safe abortion care, but often missing from the public dialogue about Roe and abortion. This year I worked with the reproductive justice organization Forward Together on a series of articles from people of color, as well as queer and trans folks, reflecting on this 40th anniversary. Read more…

Wading in Uncomfortable Waters: Abortion and the Politics of Experience

by Taja Lindley

Originally published at Feministe

Forty years after abortion became legal in the United States we are still wading in waters that run deep.

Arguably, abortion runs as deep in our modern human history as pregnancy does. Our ancestors had ways of terminating pregnancies long before the U.S. Supreme Court existed. And while we commemorate and celebrate the 40th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, we know that it does not mark an anniversary of the beginning of this family planning method. Abortion has been, and will continue to be, part of a wide array of methods that we use to control our bodies and fertility, regardless of its legality. Read more…

Wading in Uncomfortable Waters: Abortion and the Politics of Experience

by Taja Lindley

Originally published at Feministe

Forty years after abortion became legal in the United States we are still wading in waters that run deep.

Arguably, abortion runs as deep in our modern human history as pregnancy does. Our ancestors had ways of terminating pregnancies long before the U.S. Supreme Court existed. And while we commemorate and celebrate the 40th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, we know that it does not mark an anniversary of the beginning of this family planning method. Abortion has been, and will continue to be, part of a wide array of methods that we use to control our bodies and fertility, regardless of its legality. Read more…

5 Things I Learned About Abortion By Checking My Assumptions At the Door

by Samara Azam-Yu

Originally posted at Colorlines.

As a young woman of color and an activist, it can feel like being a tiny, relatively unimportant drop in a formidable tide of change. But one thing makes me certain I must continue to do this work: somehow, women of color, young women, low-income women, immigrant women, and women in rural areas are still waiting while barriers to sexual and reproductive health care, including abortion, continue to trump legal rights and provision of health services, human dignity, and self-determination. Read more…

5 Things I Learned About Abortion By Checking My Assumptions At the Door

by Samara Azam-Yu

Originally posted at Colorlines.

As a young woman of color and an activist, it can feel like being a tiny, relatively unimportant drop in a formidable tide of change. But one thing makes me certain I must continue to do this work: somehow, women of color, young women, low-income women, immigrant women, and women in rural areas are still waiting while barriers to sexual and reproductive health care, including abortion, continue to trump legal rights and provision of health services, human dignity, and self-determination. Read more…

Happy 40th: 5 Ways Roe V. Wade is Undermined in Mississippi

by Jazmine Walker

As a Mississippian, I have watched government officials, church leaders, anti-choice activists, and citizens fight tirelessly to criminalize abortion in my home state. Though I am grateful for the positive impact Roe v. Wade has had for women across the nation, I can’t help but find celebrating its 40th anniversary bittersweet. Read more…

Happy 40th: 5 Ways Roe V. Wade is Undermined in Mississippi

by Jazmine Walker

As a Mississippian, I have watched government officials, church leaders, anti-choice activists, and citizens fight tirelessly to criminalize abortion in my home state. Though I am grateful for the positive impact Roe v. Wade has had for women across the nation, I can’t help but find celebrating its 40th anniversary bittersweet. Read more…

Reproductive Emancipation

by Heidi Williamson

The institution of slavery depended heavily on black women’s ability to produce and reproduce. Black women worked in the fields, as well as bore the responsibility of bearing future generations of human beings to sustain the institution of slavery itself. Both were expected and both were delivered. Read more…

Reproductive Emancipation

by Heidi Williamson

The institution of slavery depended heavily on black women’s ability to produce and reproduce. Black women worked in the fields, as well as bore the responsibility of bearing future generations of human beings to sustain the institution of slavery itself. Both were expected and both were delivered. Read more…

Abortion Access and Young Women of Color

by Daisy Khamphakdy

She was 14 years old, going into the 9th grade and pregnant. From the moment she learned she was pregnant, she contemplated what to do. Not comprehending how to even deliver a baby, let alone how to take care of a child for the rest of her life, prompted grave fears about her future. Being the eldest of an immigrant family of seven, she had to learn early to take on the role of her family’s translator and primary caretaker. She could not fathom how she would tell them about her pregnancy. Read more…

Abortion Access and Young Women of Color

by Daisy Khamphakdy

She was 14 years old, going into the 9th grade and pregnant. From the moment she learned she was pregnant, she contemplated what to do. Not comprehending how to even deliver a baby, let alone how to take care of a child for the rest of her life, prompted grave fears about her future. Being the eldest of an immigrant family of seven, she had to learn early to take on the role of her family’s translator and primary caretaker. She could not fathom how she would tell them about her pregnancy. Read more…

The Road to Roe

by Cynthia Greenlee-Donnell

Every year when the anniversary of Roe v. Wade rolls around, I am troubled by the loud silences in our triumphant tales of struggle. Our pro-choice creation myths—including true stories about 26-year-old Sarah Weddington facing the Supreme Court, the Jane collective of Chicago referring women to safe abortion care in the 1960s, and countless women who died from unsafe abortions—are largely narratives without the voices and contributions of African Americans. Read more…

The Road to Roe

by Cynthia Greenlee-Donnell

Every year when the anniversary of Roe v. Wade rolls around, I am troubled by the loud silences in our triumphant tales of struggle. Our pro-choice creation myths—including true stories about 26-year-old Sarah Weddington facing the Supreme Court, the Jane collective of Chicago referring women to safe abortion care in the 1960s, and countless women who died from unsafe abortions—are largely narratives without the voices and contributions of African Americans. Read more…

Are We Our Choices?

by Christopher Roberts

For women of color this assumption of an inherent inability to choose for oneself is compounded by the systemic belief about racial inferiority in the United States. One needs look no further than the phasing out of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in the U.S. recently. The major reasons for the expiration of VAWA, which had been active since 1994, were that it extended protections to undocumented women, and empowered tribal courts on Native American land—or rather, reservation spaces; the entire country is Native American land. Read more…

Are We Our Choices?

by Christopher Roberts

For women of color this assumption of an inherent inability to choose for oneself is compounded by the systemic belief about racial inferiority in the United States. One needs look no further than the phasing out of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in the U.S. recently. The major reasons for the expiration of VAWA, which had been active since 1994, were that it extended protections to undocumented women, and empowered tribal courts on Native American land—or rather, reservation spaces; the entire country is Native American land. Read more…