Category Archives: youth

The Story that Took 10 Years to Tell

by Shanelle Matthews

Originally published at Crunk Feminist Collective.

“Are you in college?” The doctor could tell from my face I wasn’t at all interested in having a conversation. “You speak well. I mean, you’re articulate.” The wrinkles in my forehead deepened. I wrung my fingers tightly around the scratchy, blue exam gown and briefly thought about the woman who wore it before me; what was she like? I looked at him, desperately wanting to not have to actually speak, wishing he could just read my mind. “Yes. I’m in college,” I responded shortly. I was really thinking, “That’s none of your business and really, is this the time to make small talk? When your elbow is deep in my vagina?”
Read more…

The Story that Took 10 Years to Tell

by Shanelle Matthews

Originally published at Crunk Feminist Collective.

“Are you in college?” The doctor could tell from my face I wasn’t at all interested in having a conversation. “You speak well. I mean, you’re articulate.” The wrinkles in my forehead deepened. I wrung my fingers tightly around the scratchy, blue exam gown and briefly thought about the woman who wore it before me; what was she like? I looked at him, desperately wanting to not have to actually speak, wishing he could just read my mind. “Yes. I’m in college,” I responded shortly. I was really thinking, “That’s none of your business and really, is this the time to make small talk? When your elbow is deep in my vagina?”
Read more…

A Young Latina’s Reflection on “Choice”

by Anonymous

“While sitting in the doctor’s office after receiving the pregnancy results, I couldn’t help to think that there was more to what she asked me, “Do you think you’ll need counseling?” This question allowed me to imagine the very real situations in which states intervene in women’s bodies and decisions. Although I was able to access the critical services I needed, I know that my situation doesn’t always reflect the realities of other Latina women across California or the nation.” Read more…

A Young Latina’s Reflection on “Choice”

by Anonymous

“While sitting in the doctor’s office after receiving the pregnancy results, I couldn’t help to think that there was more to what she asked me, “Do you think you’ll need counseling?” This question allowed me to imagine the very real situations in which states intervene in women’s bodies and decisions. Although I was able to access the critical services I needed, I know that my situation doesn’t always reflect the realities of other Latina women across California or the nation.” Read more…

Reclaiming Spaces: Latinas and Abortion in the U.S.

by Myra Durán

“As one of those young women, I have been on many panels, radio shows and events reaffirming the existence of a generation of activists who are not only involved but integrate these issues into their everyday life. We don’t just limit our activism to abortion and birth control – we constantly have to push back on “apathetic” rhetoric that is used to describe us and our political work.” Read more…

Reclaiming Spaces: Latinas and Abortion in the U.S.

by Myra Durán

“As one of those young women, I have been on many panels, radio shows and events reaffirming the existence of a generation of activists who are not only involved but integrate these issues into their everyday life. We don’t just limit our activism to abortion and birth control – we constantly have to push back on “apathetic” rhetoric that is used to describe us and our political work.” Read more…

5 Things I Learned About Abortion By Checking My Assumptions At the Door

by Samara Azam-Yu

Originally posted at Colorlines.

As a young woman of color and an activist, it can feel like being a tiny, relatively unimportant drop in a formidable tide of change. But one thing makes me certain I must continue to do this work: somehow, women of color, young women, low-income women, immigrant women, and women in rural areas are still waiting while barriers to sexual and reproductive health care, including abortion, continue to trump legal rights and provision of health services, human dignity, and self-determination. Read more…

5 Things I Learned About Abortion By Checking My Assumptions At the Door

by Samara Azam-Yu

Originally posted at Colorlines.

As a young woman of color and an activist, it can feel like being a tiny, relatively unimportant drop in a formidable tide of change. But one thing makes me certain I must continue to do this work: somehow, women of color, young women, low-income women, immigrant women, and women in rural areas are still waiting while barriers to sexual and reproductive health care, including abortion, continue to trump legal rights and provision of health services, human dignity, and self-determination. Read more…

Forty – not young, not old

by Mariotta Gary-Smith

My mother spoke passionately about how she wanted more for me—she wanted me to have all that she’d worked for and to understand why she chose to fight and advocate. She talked to me about my right to a life full of “unending potential, possibility, and promise.” She talked about my right to choose, the various choices I would be making, and how I would make them. Read more…

Forty – not young, not old

by Mariotta Gary-Smith

My mother spoke passionately about how she wanted more for me—she wanted me to have all that she’d worked for and to understand why she chose to fight and advocate. She talked to me about my right to a life full of “unending potential, possibility, and promise.” She talked about my right to choose, the various choices I would be making, and how I would make them. Read more…

Roe v. Wade and Recovering from Shame

by Mai Doan

When I asked one of our young women what she wished had been different, she said that she wished that when young women had abortions they could talk about it with pride. She said that young women who make hard decisions and pull together the strength within themselves and their communities needed to move through the abortion process—these women deserve to be proud of themselves. Read more…

Roe v. Wade and Recovering from Shame

by Mai Doan

When I asked one of our young women what she wished had been different, she said that she wished that when young women had abortions they could talk about it with pride. She said that young women who make hard decisions and pull together the strength within themselves and their communities needed to move through the abortion process—these women deserve to be proud of themselves. Read more…

The New Roe

by Kierra Johnson

It was my 16-year-old sister’s unplanned pregnancy and her decision to parent that catapulted me into this work.

Every day, young women and men call Choice USA’s office, visit a campus table, stumble onto our tumblr or facebook, attend a workshop or speaking engagement. They come to us waving many identity banners: Latina, progressive, Baptist, independent, environmentalist, social justice activist, queer, black, immigrant, anti-abortion,Democrat, Catholic….What they all have in common is a unique story set in the 21st century about the real barriers they face as they attempt to access information, medication, and services. Read more…

The New Roe

by Kierra Johnson

It was my 16-year-old sister’s unplanned pregnancy and her decision to parent that catapulted me into this work.

Every day, young women and men call Choice USA’s office, visit a campus table, stumble onto our tumblr or facebook, attend a workshop or speaking engagement. They come to us waving many identity banners: Latina, progressive, Baptist, independent, environmentalist, social justice activist, queer, black, immigrant, anti-abortion,Democrat, Catholic….What they all have in common is a unique story set in the 21st century about the real barriers they face as they attempt to access information, medication, and services. Read more…